North Queensland Cowboys logo

North Queensland Cowboys forward Scott Bolton has pleased guilty to common assault, after an incident at a Sydney bar back in May.

Bolton allegedly grabbed a woman on the upper thigh as she moved off a couch, and the 31-year-old pleaded guilty to common assault for that action in Waverley Local Court on Monday morning.

The Cowboys released the following statement surrounding the incident.

Today, North Queensland Cowboys player Scott Bolton appeared in Waverley Local Court as part of the legal process surrounding an allegation made against him in May of 2018.

Both police and the complainant agreed to the fact sheet tendered to the Court which alleged a common assault and confirmed Scott’s insistence that he never touched the complainant in an indecent way.

Scott pleaded guilty to the common assault and the Court accepted that there was no indecent conduct nor violence on his part.

The Court ordered that no conviction be recorded and imposed a 12-month good behaviour bond. No fine or any other sanction was imposed by the Court.

Scott will make a statement in due course.

15 COMMENTS

    • If there was nothing physically or sexually harming in the contact made, and there was no nefarious intentions, then he should not be charged.
      This is pretty much in line with what Joe Blow on the street would cop in the same situation.

  1. It’s been a pretty sad state of affairs with the behaviour of some players lately. Now everyone deserves the presumption of innocence until proven guilty but it seems there’s a growing trend among some players.
    I get really annoyed by them constantly being referred to as “the boys”. Well they’re grown men, who like everyone else in society, needs to be held accountable for their actions. They need to start acting the part. They’re supposed to be role models, they’re paid a motza, pandered to by their club and idolised by fans , then they think they can just go do whatever they want and all will be forgiven. Who the he’ll do they think they are?
    Perhaps it’s time for them to realise the people they upset or abuse are the same people who are paying to see them and without those people, they’re NOTHING!

    • I agree Biff with what you say, In the courts system though everyone is guilty until proven innocent. Many innocent people are presumed guilty and have to fight the charge to clear their name. That’s just the way it is. It’s a myth that you are innocent until proven guilty.

      All these modern day footballers who are regarded by the NRL as role models for our children who follow the sport, need to know how the problem arises. 90% of these violent or sexual acts are because the footballer has had to much to drink and when a person is in a drunken state of mind they like every human being do things or say things that are out of character for the individual. I think the NRL maybe need to educate the players with further alcohol use advise. their mothers need to educate them also how to treat females. Some people out there just look at them as a sex object rather than a delicate individual.👴👍

  2. It’s been a pretty sad state of affairs with the behaviour of some players lately. Now everyone deserves the presumption of innocence until proven guilty but it seems there’s a growing trend among some players.
    I get really annoyed by them constantly being referred to as “the boys”. Well they’re grown men, who like everyone else in society, needs to be held accountable for their actions. They need to start acting the part. They’re supposed to be role models, they’re paid a motza, pandered to by their club and idolised by fans , then they think they can just go do whatever they want and all will be forgiven. Who the hell do they think they are?
    Perhaps it’s time for them to realise the people they upset or abuse are the same people who are paying to see them and without those people, they’re NOTHING!

  3. Was allocated a great Barrister, no doubt paid by Greenberg..

    Watch for Hayne to get the same outcome….

    Watch for the lesser likes of Chee Kam and Musgrove to get convicted and made an example of by the game…just to appease…

    • 2041, I’m not so sure Hayne’s got too many mates to stand behind him now. Looking more everyday like the rugby league world is turning it’s back on him.
      Lotta baggage there – both here and overseas.

  4. From what I understand the NRL does a lot with education on booze and respect towards woman, but I guess some players just can’t be educated. From what I can recall, all the off-field issues have involved players being under the influence of booze. I think the clubs need to take more responsibility with developing an internal culture that is professional, healthy and respectful. A book called “The Legacy “ about the All Blacks is a good read and relevant.

    • If the NRL has an education system in place for both those important topics and players continue to choose to get “blacked out” on the grog then that choice to go out and get blasted to a state of no memory needs to be addressed. If they then harm others then long term suspensions like years not months need to apply. Harsh penalties need to be applied to counteract the growing number of offenders. 💪🐔👍

    • Suechi, I agree with most of what you say, but I think the individual players need to take responsibility. The clubs, like the NRL, can only provide so much education the rest is up to the players. But I think the culture of the whole organisation needs to change. It’s all very well to protect your stars , but what message does that send to everyone else. Times have changed and so have the levels of acceptable behaviour.
      Most players seem to be able to act like decent blokes, maybe they’re smarter than those who get themselves into trouble.

  5. WoodChook, you’re right. Severe penalties should be put in place.
    I saw this morning the Knights have fined Jacob Saifiti 25% of his contracted salary for the altercation he had with Boyd Cordner’s brother , where he got knocked out and broke his leg. That’s $50k with $25k suspended. That’s at least hitting them where it hurts.
    Apparently the Knights will impose this penalty on all players and more serious breaches will incur heavy suspension or termination. About time. It would be good to see this flow on across all clubs. Plenty of young talent waiting for a chance for a spot in the NRL. Might make some of the bigger names think twice.

  6. Biff from what I have seen, experienced and heard, the real issue is within the elite players and the examples they set. Club captains, “legends” and rep players can get a few get out of jail cards because of their status. Their clubs, The NRL, managers, players and media give them certain privileges- all setting an poor example for the rest, but also giving the impression that it is OK as long as you don’t get caught – and if you do, just apologise and get back on it.

  7. Suechi, your comments pretty much sum it up beautifully. The same can be said about anyone living in the public eye these days. What is it they say, there’s no such thing as bad publicity.
    I can appreciate that clubs don’t want to have to suspend top players because of the skills they bring to a team, let’s face it they’ve paid huge dollars to have them there, but something needs to be done. Maybe the quarter of their annual salary fine, as the Knights have introduced, may have a bigger impact than the threat of suspension. But I also think you’re right when you say that some people just can’t be educated in to behavioural changes.

Comments are closed.